If the Democratic confrontation last week in Nevada was “The Godfather” of debates, last night’s South Carolina debate wasn’t “The Godfather Part II” — a worthy followup to a great original.

No, it was “Exorcist 2: The Heretic.” It was “Smokey and the Bandit 3: Smokey Is the Bandit.” It was “True Detective Season 2.”

Who made the South Carolina debate the worst sequel ever? Here are the nominees:

Elizabeth Warren, for hijacking the proceedings about five minutes in so she could continue pounding Michael Bloomberg on the very same issue she sought to use to rip his throat out last week.

Fine, his reportedly ugly comments about women who worked for his company are fair game.

But then Warren did it again. And then she interrupted other debaters so she could do it a third time. And a fourth.

She was a one-hit wonder giving herself encores with her one hit. This was one case when Warren’s “nevertheless, she persisted” reputation turned around on her.

Michael Bloomberg, for getting 95 percent of the way to saying he had bought and paid for the 2018 election. He wanted to score points for helping the Democratic Party and bragged he had dropped $100 million to help the Dems take the majority in the House of Representatives.

“All of the new Democrats that came in put Nancy Pelosi in charge and gave the Congress the ability to control this president, I bough — got them,“ Bloomberg said.

Yep. Bloomberg got that close to saying he’d bought the 2018 election for the Democrats. You want oligarchy? You got oligarchy.

Joe Biden, for adding 10 million dead Americans to the nation’s mortuaries. He wanted to hit Bernie Sanders for voting to give gun manufacturers immunity from tort suits — and said that because of Bernie’s vote, 150 million Americans had been killed by guns.

That’s about 12 million Americans killed by guns every year. Ummm … Only 2.8 million people die in America every year — of all causes. It reminds one that Biden said while campaigning earlier in the day that he was running … for the US Senate.

Bernie Sanders, who described the elected leader of the Middle East’s only democracy as a “reactionary racist” in the midst of an evening when he said he opposed “authoritarians” but could not bring himself to say he opposed Communists — because, of course, he didn’t and probably doesn’t.

When the audience in the room made rude noises after he said Fidel Castro had done good things, he responded in disbelief: “Really? Really?”

Yes. Really.

Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, whose dreadful handling of the first half-hour on CBS meant that the proceedings turned into an embarrassing free-for-all. Their ineffectuality was matched by their incompetence; O’Donnell actually announced the debate was over and then King said, oh wait, we have another segment coming.

But they didn’t. They just had another commercial break they wanted us to stay for.

Who wins the Razzie? You pick. I can’t.

There’s nothing to say about Tom Steyer except that he said it’s a misconception his money defines him — when his money is literally the only reason this Montgomery-Burns-with-better-hair was even standing on that stage.

Amy Klobuchar found herself upbraided by Gayle King when she hadn’t offered a bromide quickly enough about what defines her. “I thought I had a minute to answer,” she protested — and her exasperation at the disrespect she’d been shown was entirely understandable, if a little painful.

Pete Buttigieg got off the best line when he said Sanders has “nostalgia for the revolution politics of the ’60s.” He was the only candidate on the stage who had a strategy to try to derail Sanders’ momentum.

He did what he could. But everybody else was just so lousy at it. Or, in the case of Warren, too wrapped up in her misty water-colored memories of her triumph over Bloomberg last week to pay attention to the guy who is actually eating her lunch — the guy who has every reason to think (no matter what happens in South Carolina) that he is heading inexorably for the center stage in Milwaukee.