Eduardo Rojas already had one of New York’s toughest jobs on two wheels — delivering groceries for Whole Foods in Manhattan — but the coronavirus has given his work a higher calling.

Eduardo Rojas
Eduardo RojasTaidgh Barron/NY Post

“The people in hospitals are risking their lives. In the same way, I feel like we are a big part of this as well. Many people, they truly need to receive their food or groceries at home because they cannot expose themselves outside,” Rojas, 25, told The Post.

“It’s a great honor to help them. God always taught us it’s better to serve than be served.”

Five or six days a week, Rojas takes the early morning 6 train from his home in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx to East 57th Street, where he starts work at 7:30 a.m.

There, he saddles up on a pedal-powered e-bike with a trailer hitch that can fit up to six bins filled with groceries.

In a single day, Rojas completes anywhere between four and six runs up and down the East Side, between 50th Street and 80th Street, with as many as 11 stops on each run.

Many of the customers Rojas serves are home-bound due to preexisting conditions that put them at high risk for COVID-19.

And they appreciate the essential service Rojas provides. One woman recently handed him an envelope with a cash tip and a bag of wipes, he recalled.

“It really moved me, and encouraged me to do this with even more joy and thankfulness in my heart,” he said. “People are concerned about essential workers. They realize we are on the frontline as well.”

On Monday, he battled heavy rain and wind for the duration of his shift, but said his faith and the knowledge that he’s helping families in need keep him going.

“Of course nobody wants to work in the rain. I try to overcome the trials and hardship and stay with a positive mind, realizing that I’m doing it for families that need it,” he said.

“Even before the coronavirus, I realized that a lot of elderly people need help. Today, even more people need it.”

Do you have a nominee for The Post’s Hero of the Day? E-mail heroes@nypost.com