From price-checking to handling repairs themselves, women are embracing all sorts of tactics to feel more confident in their buying decisions, according to new research.

The study of 2,000 women examined how respondents feel empowered by educating themselves and researching before making a purchase, especially in “male-centric” businesses.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Continental Tire, the survey revealed when it comes to their cars, respondents want to make sure they know what they’re talking about in a vehicle repair shop.

SWNS

Three in four do their own research on pricing and repairs before entering an automotive shop, in order to guarantee they receive fair prices.

Knowledge is certainly power and helps respondents feel assertive when it comes down to dollars and cents. Sixty-five percent admitted they felt more confident entering a mechanic’s shop after researching first.

Three in four women polled said they want to feel more confident beyond price knowledge and would like to spruce up their vehicle upkeep skills.

Young women are even more interested in taking control behind the wheel: results found women 18–23 were 17 percent more likely than women 56 and older to want to feel self-assured in their vehicle know-how.

Thirty-eight percent of women surveyed want to learn more about engine maintenance and a third would like to have a firmer grasp on the different parts of an engine.

Some respondents have already mastered some key skills. One remarked she’ll handle repairs to her car’s transmission or brakes, while another said she doesn’t need to call for a tow in case of a flat tire ‒ she’ll put the spare on herself.

One area women want to have a better grasp on are the car wheels themselves.

Nearly two-thirds confessed they don’t feel confident in their tire knowledge — but a third want to know how to check the tire size and 30 percent wish they knew how to find out the remaining life in a tire.

Two-thirds of respondents admitted they couldn’t inflate a tire (65 percent) or change a tire without looking at instructions (69 percent).

“It is incredibly important as a woman in the automotive industry in which I work, to absorb as much knowledge as possible,” said Courtney Hansen, Executive Producer and Host of “The Ride That Got Away.”

“Knowledge is power. I grew up around cars and understand a good bit about them, but I’m always reading, watching the pros and researching to learn more and more in order to feel confident and informed when making purchase decisions, handling emergency situations and when getting my vehicle serviced.”

Unfortunately, there are still instances where women feel apprehensive about their knowledge and the treatment they receive because of it.

Three in five women feel uncomfortable in male-centric stores due to men assuming they lack knowledge about the area the store services.

Sixty-two percent of female drivers felt insecure about their knowledge in automotive stores while 49 percent confessed to feeling out-of-the-loop in computer/technology shops.

Other places women have felt insecure included liquor stores (49 percent), financial institutions (43 percent) and grocery stores (41 percent).

Still, many women can get a sense when they’re being taken advantage of. Two in five (41 percent) have followed their gut and refused a service because they had a hunch they were given an unfair price.

And two in five women surveyed have asked a man to accompany them to a “masculine” business so they don’t get taken advantage of.

Of those women who asked a man to accompany them, over half had originally visited the store alone but returned with a man to guarantee they received the best service.

“Continental Tire’s website and social media pages are loaded with important and helpful information that educates you on how to feel more confident when you’re behind the wheel when getting your vehicles serviced and when making purchase decisions,” Hansen added.

“Their warranty program, the Total Confidence Plan, gives me extra confidence in how I’m caring for my ride and how I’m keeping my family safe on the roads. There are so many valuable tools to arm me with the knowledge I want and need.”

Vehicle maintenance respondents can do without instructions

  • Locate tire size: 58 percent
  • Check tire pressure: 56 percent
  • Check remaining tire life: 38 percent
  • Inflate tires: 35 percent
  • Change a tire: 31 percent