I’m in my 50s and looking for a job for the first time in 25 years. I’ve had great success in my career, but I don’t seem to be getting much traction. I’m also feeling a little old and dated in job interviews. Any advice for an old-timer?
First of all, I think there’s a law that you aren’t allowed to call yourself an “old-timer” until you are in your 70s (and I think even some 70-year-olds would take issue with that). Come on, man — you’re still in your prime. But maybe you need to refresh some things, starting with your attitude, because that speaks louder than what is on your resume. A little makeover never hurts, either. Successful people are always refreshing themselves to look and stay relevant. Just like dating, the rules really haven’t changed. (Not that you would know by watching “The Bachelor,” which should cure anyone from ever wanting to date again.) Look the part and project confidence. With any luck, you’ve updated your wardrobe in the last 25 years. If not, do it now. Then look at your skills to see if you need to refresh any by taking online or continuing-education courses. Then restart your search with a new outlook. You’ve got this.

What can we do about Gen Zs in the workplace? Managing these kids is becoming harder and harder, and I am getting too old for this. Help!

Well, you could cater to their every need and whim, just like many tried with millennials ,with limited success. Or you can stop treating millions of diverse people as a stereotype. People, we have to stop acting like societal change is something new. Throughout history, each generation has brought about change, mostly for the good. What doesn’t change is what most human beings want, which is respect, empowerment and purpose. Create a compelling vision for your company — most people want to do meaningful work. Celebrate diversity and individuality, making everyone feel welcome, safe and respected. Treat people fairly and professionally. Provide opportunities to develop and advance, and throw in a little fun. Then you won’t have to worry about which alphabet generation is coming along next.