Lyft is suing New York City — the ride-sharing app demanding a new “unreasonable and irrational” rule against app-based vehicles cruising while empty be tossed out, according to a new report.

The company filed the lawsuit against the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission in Manhattan Supreme Court Friday — less than a month after competitor Uber also sued the city over the cap which is aimed at reducing congestion in Manhattan, Crains New York reported.

App-based vehicles currently drive empty 41% of the time they are on the road, according to the report.

Lyft claims that the new rule — which requires ride-sharing vehicles to reduce their cruising-empty time to 31% by Aug. — is “highly damaging” because it does not apply to taxis and because officials did not reportedly look at whether it was achievable.

Lyft and Uber want to the rule, passed it August, to be vacated and annulled.

“Lyft supports comprehensive congestion pricing, which is the most effective way to reduce traffic,” a Lyft spokeswoman said in a statement.

“But the TLC’s rushed, arbitrary approach would be a significant step backwards for transportation in New York City, which for years has suffered from an inefficient taxi medallion system created by the TLC,” she said.

“This rule is not a serious attempt to address congestion, and would hurt riders and drivers in New York.”