These New York spots are gone but not forgotten.

From a former insane asylum in the East River to a beloved ballpark to arguably the greatest department store New York City has ever known, some of the boroughs’ most colorful historic spaces have been taken by time — but a new podcast series in conjunction with Open House New York plans to memorialize their most fascinating tales.

Though the pandemic forced the annual celebration of NYC architecture to make many of its events virtual this year, the coronavirus also inspired the festival to change things and explore not only standing but long-gone city sites.

“If we’re all going to be unable to visit these places anyhow, then let’s talk about all those places that don’t exist anymore,” said Peter-Christian Aigner, director of the Gotham Center for NYC History, which produced a new season of its podcast “Sites and Sounds,” called “Lost NYC,” about the stories of extinct borough spots.

Going digital also means that the festival will be accessible to a global audience, as well as locals who failed to score limited tickets to OHNY’s most popular experiences in years past.

Here’s a selection of the vanished city locales the free series will explore in roughly 20-minute segments on OHNY this weekend.

This remote, 20-acre East River island 1,000 feet from the South Bronx shoreline was once the home of Riverside Hospital, an infectious-disease institution used to quarantine New Yorkers — most famously Typhoid Mary. The island has been abandoned since 1963 and is off-limits to all but Parks Department-sanctioned boaters. Randall Mason, co-author of the book “North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City,” will be revisiting its plagued history. In 1904, the passenger ship General Slocum caught fire not far from the island, and hospital staffers were among those who helped pull more than 1,000 bodies to shore.

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North Brother Island in Nov. 2015.

Angel Chevrestt

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North Brother Island in Nov. 2015.

Angel Chevrestt

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North Brother Island in Nov. 2015.

Angel Chevrestt

Helping Young Drug Addicts
Nov. 11, 1952: Occupational therapist Rose Engel conducts a painting class at New York City Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island in the East River, the first and only institution in the nation set up to help teenage narcotic users.

Wide World Photos

Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island.
Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island.

Alamy Stock Photo

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Today known as Roosevelt Island, Blackwell’s Island was also used to quarantine New Yorkers, although it’s far more accessible than North Brother. The 2-mile long stretch of land in the middle of the East River is experiencing a real estate boom as a result of the coronavirus, but long had a reputation for being far from desirable thanks to the dark network of institutions that operated on it in the late 1800s. Stacy Horn, author of the book “Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad, and Criminal in 19th-Century New York,” walks listeners through the grisly halls of Roosevelt Island’s former lunatic asylum, workhouse, almshouse, penitentiary and hospital. In 1887, the journalist Nellie Bly had herself admitted to the island’s Women’s Lunatic Asylum and shocked the nation with her expose about widespread abuses.

Welfare Island
Aerial shot of Welfare Island, fomerly known as Blackwell’s Island.

Bettmann Archive

Blackwell's Island Hospital
The interior of a hospital on Blackwell’s Island, circa 1880.

Getty Images

Line Up
Circa 1890: A group of prisoners are lined up at the Lock-step Penitentiary on Blackwell’s Island.

Getty Images

Prisoner work gang returning to Blackwell's Island penitentiary in New York harbor, 1870s. Hand-colored woodcut
Prisoner work gang returning to Blackwell’s Island penitentiary in New York harbor, 1870s. Hand-colored woodcut.

Alamy Stock Photo

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The beloved former home of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Ebbets Field is now the site of a large housing development, but even all these decades since the team left for Los Angeles, the former stadium’s legacy remains strong. Indeed, the ground is hallowed and holy to many of the Dodgers’ most loyal fans, argues Bob McGee, podcast host and author of “The Greatest Ballpark Ever: Ebbets Field and the Story of the Brooklyn Dodgers.” Before heading west in 1957, the team flirted with the idea of moving to the current site of Brooklyn’s Barclays Center. Today, locals can pay a visit to its home plate marker, in a Crown Heights parking lot.

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Sept. 13, 1942: An aerial view of Ebbets Field, home to the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team. It was like a death in the family for Brooklyn baseball fans when their beloved Dodgers left the borough for California.AP

The Domino Sugar factory is now the site of one of Williamsburg’s most popular parks and a towering condominium complex, but it was once the world’s largest sugar refinery. In the mid-1800s, it melted down more than 3 million pounds of raw sugar daily, playing a key role in a sweet but powerful industry with widespread effects, New-York Historical Society fellow Brendan Cooper argues in a corresponding podcast. OHNY will also be hosting a virtual studio tour of the Domino Sugar Refinery, a landmarked portion of the former factory.

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The Domino Sugar factory.

Matthew McDermott

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Domino Park on May 31, 2018.

Annie Wermiel/NY Post

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Many visitors to Central Park are unaware that the green space was once a small but vibrant free black community — the 300 members of which were evicted from their little neighborhood to make way for the park. The lost nabe contained three churches, two cemeteries and a school. It’s the subject of an upcoming history called “The Rise and Fall of Seneca Village.” Its author, Alexander Manevitz, narrates this podcast.

. Bulletin. Ethnology. a. "THE MODE OF CARRYING THE SICK OR WOUNDED. b. CEMETERY AT A SENECA VILLAGE. 1731. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and ap
The cemetery at Seneca Village, 1731.

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Archaeological Survey For Historic Settlement Begins In Central Park
Archaeologists dig with electronic fingers into the soil of Central Park to learn more about Seneca Village, a vanished 19th century settlement that existed before the park landscapers arrived in the 1850s.

Getty Images

DIGGING FOR SENECA
Archaeologists dig with electronic fingers into the soil of Central Park to learn more about Seneca Village, a vanished 19th century settlement that existed before the park landscapers arrived in the 1850s.

AP

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Once considered the grand dame of department stores — and recognizable as a location from “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” B. Altman’s for decades occupied the same Midtown building that is now home to the Gotham Center, the creator of the “Lost NYC” podcast series. The luxurious shop, designed to rival the “marble palaces” of Europe, is no more, but its influence on American culture remains strong all these years later, said Sharon Zukin, author of “Point of Purchase: How Shopping Changed American Culture.” When the flagship shuttered at the end of 1989, after nearly 125 years in business, its Fifth Avenue window displays were sold to collectors for $15,000 each.

Dancing Figures Appearing in B. Altman's Window
Out of business after 125 years, B. Altman has sold even these dancing figures dressing up the Fifth Avenue window. The displays were bought by a Dallas-based exporter. Dubbed “Holiday Ball,” the four displays went for $15,000 each.

Bettmann Archive

B. Altman & Company, 34th Street and Fifth Avenue. General view from 5th floor of the Empire State Building.
A view from the fifth floor of the Empire State Building of B. Altman & Company.

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— More than 150 coronavirus-safe insider experiences are available for free as part of the festival. The weekend’s full itinerary, including a scavenger hunt and self-guided in-person tours, is available at OHNY.org.